Family Law

Do you have a will already? If not then get one!

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Many people think that estate planning is only for the elderly or the wealthy, but have you thought about what would happen if you unexpectedly died?   Do you really want to leave you wife and kids to figure out how to manage your affairs while they are grieving?  If you have a will, then your family has options on how to proceed and it makes the legal process less trying on them.  It is even a bigger issue when you are in a blended family.  Imagine your minor children living with your ex-spouse becoming a one-half owner of your house with your current spouse.  This in it self creates drama for all those involved when it could be avoided with a simple document expressing your desires.

Many people believe that having a will makes their family go through the costly process of probate, however, in Texas the process is not costly and its a lot easier than letting Texas laws decide who gets your stuff.

How does the probate process work?  After you pass away, your executor, who you named in your will, will collect and distribute the assets to your beneficiaries during a process known as probate. This will include settling any debts you have with creditors.  The process is inexpensive, simple and non intrusive into your loved ones lives.

What happens if you don’t have a will?

  1. If you are married and all your kids are from your spouse? Your spouse gets your community property and your spouse splits your separate property with your kids.
  2. If you are remarried and have kids from another marriage?  Your new wife and your kids share all your property.  In this scenario it is common for your wife and kids to become joint owners of your home.
  3. If you are single with kids? Your stuff goes equally to your kids and if one is not living then their share goes to their children (your grandchildren from that kid).
  4. If you are single without kids?  Your stuff is divided between your parents, if one of them is deceased then that parent’s share goes to your siblings.

So you can see how the laws in Texas might not be how you want your things to be distributed and having a will leaves the decision solely up to you!  We can always find a distant relative to be your heir, but do you really want someone else deciding?  So get a will today!  My office can help, just call 817-336-2400 and ask for Patricia Cole.

 

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Estate planning in anticipation of divorce!

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Trusts can be useful tools in a divorce proceeding especially when a spouse has a direct or indirect interest in a trust. Counsel should identify specific trust features that could make a difference and impact whether trust assets can be reached, potentially affecting alimony and property division determinations.

Within the context of a divorce, trust and estate attorneys should understand specific discovery techniques family law practitioners may use to determine whether a spouse has an interest in a trust, whether that interest is material, and what attack can be made against the trust.  The key is make sure your attorney is knowledgeable before you do any estate planning in anticipation of a divorce.

“Mom, I want to live with Dad”- A Mother’s Problem

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Family Law and Divorce in Texas Plus Unsolicited Opinions

“Does my child get to pick who she wants to live with when she is 12?” I get that a lot. The answer is “yes and no.” I know, I’m a big help.

The Texas Family Code allows a child to be interviewed by the judge in chambers so that he or she can express her wishes, but that does not mean he or she is the decider.

This is a mother’s problem. Fathers don’t worry about this near as much as mothers do. Mothers feel that when their children “live” with dad, that the world must think they are a terrible mother. Think about it. People wonder, “How did she lose her children?” or “what did she do?” If a mother “loses custody,” then she must have been arrested or getting treatment. When a child decides that they would prefer to live primarily with dad, mom does not lose…

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Anonymous Client Post About Divorce, Attorney’s Fees and Preparedness

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Sometimes our clients are the smartest people we know!

Family Law and Divorce in Texas Plus Unsolicited Opinions

Note from Kelly:
A client wrote this blog after her divorce was final, with the benefit of hindsight and (probably) the anxiety of my final bill. This client was one of the most organized clients I have had. She also listened well, especially when I told her things that were difficult to hear. This client is NOT an attorney and the below information is not legal advice.

“Choosing to end a 19 year marriage, or any marriage, is not an easy decision. As Dr. Phil says “you have to earn your way out of the relationship.” Once you have decided that it is the right decision for your life, there are steps you can take to make this excruciating experience a little less painful. First and foremost, make sure you have a good therapist to walk you through the emotional process of divorce. The attorney you decide upon is NOT…

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Two Regrets of a Divorced Woman

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Family Law and Divorce in Texas Plus Unsolicited Opinions

This article was originally published by Plaid for Women https://www.plaidforwomen.com/read-post/two-regrets-of-a-divorced-woman/

The Family Courthouse is paved with women who claim the system is against them. Many feel that they waited too long and some wish they had tried harder to reconcile. Beyond the emotional wasteland left by a divorce, a divorced woman has many economical regrets. Here are two I have heard over and over again:

1. That they didn’t stay employed.

Some women report being frustrated that they were not entitled to spousal maintenance or did not get as much as they would have liked. This is especially true for the homemaker, but in our changing society where women are increasingly doing the “bread winning,” it can be true for husbands as well. Texas law allows for monthly spousal maintenance (a/k/a support) up to $5,000 or 20% of an ex-spouse’s gross income, whichever is lower, if a spouse can prove…

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Reasons to Get Along With Ex-Spouse

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What a wonderful explanation of some important common sense!

Family Law and Divorce in Texas Plus Unsolicited Opinions

1. MONEY! If you have become intimately familiar with the billable hour and retainers then you know what I am talking about. Reading billing statements showing entries for lawyer time for discussing who gets “this” or “that” is painful. Clients find themselves asking “I have to pay a thousand dollar bill from my attorney because my ex-spouse’s attorney called her five times to negotiate the china cabinet?” How does that make sense? If spouses are able discuss what assets and debts go with whom, then they will save money. It goes without saying that the attorney’s fees factor can grow exponentially when there are parenting issues.

2. It’s better for the kids. I’m just a family law attorney, but how can children learn to resolve conflict if their parents can’t agree on a pick up time or child support? They may learn how to build walls, ahem, I mean boundaries, but they…

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