nursing care

Beware: Texas law does not require CPR in senior living facilities

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Earlier this month, the news reported on a 911 call that was taken by a nurse in California who refused to give emergency CPR assistance to a dying senior in her care.  The refusal of this nurse to assist a dying resident is nothing less than shocking, however, the facility was within its rights to refuse care.

In Texas, facilities, even licenses facilities such as those regulated by Adult Protective Services, have the option of not providing CPR.  However, they are required to notify  individuals during the admissions policy process that they will not administer CPR.

The question is whether notifying people upon admissions is reasonable.   It is likely that facilities around the state have a form that is signed during admissions stating they are aware of the policy of the facility.  However, during the admissions process, there are tons of documents to sign and many people do not even read them.  Does this constitute notice?

Does the nurses refusal to administer aid constitute a criminal case in Texas? Failure to stop and render aid (FSRA) is governed by Chapter 550 of the Texas  Transportation Code. The penal code typically governs criminal offenses  resulting in possible confinement and a conviction for FSRA can result in jail time,  probation and a fine.   However the Texas nurse is not likely guilty of FSRA because the rules are pretty clear that the facility is not required to provide CPR.  If this were you or me, we would be required if we knew CPR.  Funny!  So beware of the facilities policy before you place your love one in a senior living facility!

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